Month: July 2007

Arizona’s Fair and Legal Employment Act Being Challenged

by National Peo National Peo No Comments

Recently, Governor Janet Napolitano signed the Fair and Legal Employment Act, which mandates effective 1/1/08, that all Arizona employers run new hires through the Basic Pilot Program, electronic employment verification system, cross checking names with social security numbers. Employer groups, such as the Arizona Contractors Association, are challenging the statute, stating that it is unconstitutional and that Immigration is a federal issue, not to differ from state to state and one that all employers can comply with.

It is anticipated that the construction trades and hospitality industries will be hardest hit. Could this law be another Trojan Horse? Should this law take effect, its implications are far reaching. Protesters of Immigration Reform efforts have long argued that the positions held by illegal immigrants are positions that others do not care to peruse. So, who can we turn to for labor? Many believe that these jobs may be filled by recent high school graduates, who may not choose further education or a professional path, but recent studies reveal that even our 18 year old children will not work for minimum wage.

What you need to save to be a millionaire

by National Peo National Peo No Comments

Most people retire with not much savings and have to rely mainly on Social Security. Not good planning. So how do you become a millionaire? Start investing early. This table, courtesy of Kiplinger’s 2007 retirement planning guide, shows what you need to save monthly to accumulate $1 million by age 65. Start now!

IF YOU’RE 25
You’ve saved: $0
What you need to save per month: $286

IF YOU’RE 35
You’ve saved: $0
What you need to save per month: $671
You’ve saved: $50,000
What you need to save per month: $304

IF YOU’RE 45
You’ve saved: $0
What you need to save per month: $1,698
You’ve saved: $50,000
What you need to save per month: $1,298
You’ve saved: $100,000
What you need to save per month: $861

IF YOU’RE 55
You’ve saved: $0
What you need to save per month: $5,466
You’ve saved:$50,000
What you need to save per month: $4,859
You’ve saved: $100,000
What you need to save per month: $4,253
You’ve saved: $200,000
What you need to save per month: $3,040

The figures assume the money is invested in a tax-deferred retirement account, earning 8 percent annually with all earnings reinvested.

Florida Enacts Domestic Violence Leave Law

by National Peo National Peo No Comments

A new Florida law that took effect July 1, 2007, requires employers with 50 or more employees to provide up to three days’ leave for a variety of activities connected with domestic violence. Employees who have worked for employers for three months or longer are eligible. Whether leave is paid or unpaid has been left to the discretion of the employer.

The law covers leave for specific activities such as:

• Seeking an injunction for protection against domestic violence.

• Obtaining medical care or mental health counseling or both for the employee or a family or household member to address injuries resulting from domestic violence.

• Obtaining services from victims services organizations such as a domestic violence shelter or rape crisis center.

• Making the employee’s home secure from the perpetrator of domestic violence or finding a new home to escape the perpetrator.

• Seeking legal assistance to address issues arising from domestic violence or attending or preparing for court-related proceedings arising from the act of domestic violence.

Under the new law, employees are required to provide “appropriate advance notice” of the need for leave, unless prevented from doing so because of imminent danger to the health or safety of the employee or a family member. The amount of notice required is determined by company policy. Also, employees must exhaust any available annual vacation or personal leave and sick leave, if applicable, unless the employer waives this requirement.

Employers must keep confidential all information relating to leave for domestic violence.

Employers are prohibited from interfering with, restraining, and denying the exercise or attempt to exercise the rights provided by this law. Additionally, employers may not discriminate or retaliate against an employee for exercising his or her rights. A person claiming to be aggrieved by a violation of the law may file a lawsuit in state circuit court seeking damages (monetary relief such as loss wages and benefits) or equitable relief (such as reinstatement) or both.

To discuss further call : Lisa Cieslica
Senior Human Resources Manager
National PEO, LLC.
480.429.8098

1 in 12 Workers Admits Using Drugs

by National Peo National Peo No Comments

WASHINGTON – One in 12 full-time workers in the United States acknowledges having used illegal drugs in the past month, the government reports.

Most of those who report using illicit drugs are employed full-time, with the highest rates among restaurant workers, 17.4 percent, and construction workers, 15.1 percent, according to a federal study being released Monday. About 4 percent of teachers and social service workers reported using illegal drugs in the past month, which was among the lowest rates.

The latest study comes from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration, an agency within the Health and Human Services Department. The data is drawn from the agency’s annual surveys in 2002, 2003 and 2004 of the civilian, non-institutionalized population. Each survey included interviews with more than 40,000 people, who were each paid $30 to participate.

Joe Gfroerer, an agency official, said most of the illicit drug use involved marijuana.

However, testing programs for drug use are fairly prevalent, with 48.8 percent of full-time workers telling the government that their employers conducted testing for drug use.

“I used to train supervisors to detect chronic use and intervene as early as possible, and that is a very good, constructive way rather than firing people,” said Skinstad, an associate professor and director of the Prairielands Addiction Technology Transfer Center at the University of Iowa. “Some employers want drug testing. I’m not sure that’s the way I would like to go. What I think I would like to focus on is employee performance.”

The study also showed that the prevalence of illegal drug use reported by full-time workers in the past month was highest among younger workers.

Nineteen percent of workers age 18 to 25 said they used illegal drugs during the past month, compared with 10.3 percent among those age 26 to 34; 7 percent among those age 35 to 49; and 2.6 percent among those age 50 to 64.

What is your drug policy? Is it evenly and fairly applied?

Mandatory Electronic Verification of Employment Eligibility in Arizona

by National Peo National Peo 2 Comments

Last week, Governor Janet Napolitano signed the Fair and Legal Employment Act, which makes mandates that all AZ employers are required to run new hires through an electronic verification system (Basic Pilot Program) to ensure employment eligibility.  The law becomes effective January 1, 2008.  In addition, the State Attorney General or County Attorneys will handle all investigations into unauthorized workers.  The Act imposes severe sanctions on employers that violate this law.  The new law establishes a progressive penalty system for employers who violate the statute:

    • First violation for knowingly hiring an unauthorized worker:
      • A court may suspend a business license for a period of up to 10 days.
      • Employer must sign a sworn affidavit stating that the employer has terminated all unauthorized workers within three business days after a finding of guilt.
      • Employer is subject to a three-year probationary period.  During this period, the employer must file quarterly reports with the County Attorney for each new employee hired by the employer.
    • First violation for intentionally hiring an unauthorized worker:
      • A court shall suspend a business license for a minimum of 10 days.
      • Employer must sign a sworn affidavit stating that the employer has terminated all unauthorized workers within three business days after a finding of guilt.
      • Employer is subject to a five-year probationary period.  During this period, the employer must file quarterly reports with the County Attorney for each new employee hired by the employer.
    • Second violation during either of the probationary periods (3 or 5 years):
      • Court shall permanently revoke all licenses that are necessary to conduct business in the State of Arizona.

In accordance with the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986, it is illegal for employers to knowingly employ individuals who do not have documentation to satisfy the requirements of the I-9 Employment Eligibility Verification form.